Author: Patricia Karamesines

Patricia blogged at Times and Seasons between 2007 and 2009. Patricia was born in Petersburg, Virginia, to two human parents…but was actually raised by the wild turtles of the Virginia Piedmont, which may explain her flaming biophilia. She joined the LDS church when she was sixteen. In 1976, she moved to Utah to attend BYU. Her M.A. is from BYU (creative writing), and she pursued post-graduate studies in folklore and linguistics at the University of Arizona. Her interests include folklore, language and relation, and literary science and nature writing. She has won numerous literary awards from Brigham Young University, the University of Arizona, the Utah Arts Council, the Utah Wilderness Association, and the Association for Mormon Letters, among others. She has published in literary journals and popular magazines locally and nationally. Her first novel, The Pictograph Murders, was released fall of 2004 (Signature Books). She lives in San Juan County, Utah, with her husband Mark and three children, an uncertain number of toads, lizards, and swallows, and about thirty hummingbirds that run the place during the summer. Currently, she is an adjunct faculty member teaching English at the San Juan Campus of the College of Eastern Utah, and a regular contributor to the One True Bloggernacle Arts Blog, William Morris’s A Motley Vision.

M Gets a Joke

A while back our household sat down to watch an episode of Monk. We like Monk because not only is it funny, it’s also sad and tender and offers good – sometimes very good – cultural satire. As I fed…

Bittersweet Sixteen: Part One

Many parents with severely disabled children live life underground. Apart from society’s burbling mainstreams, they labor beneath the weight of exigent circumstances, dealing with mortal crises day by day. They monitor their child’s breathing, their sleeping, their every bodily function,…

A Walk into the Moon

I hope some of you grabbed your moon glasses and stepped outside to have a look at how that full moon lights up the world. Thirty thousand miles closer than usual and thirty percent brighter, tonight this lesser light has…

Guilting the Lily

In the Preface to New Genesis: A Mormon Reader on Land and Community, the editors cite an unidentified 1991 report that places each of the thirty largest Christian denominations in one of five categories based on their environmental stances.

Story Time!

The day before the cliff swallows return to traditional nesting sites in canyons near where I live in southern Utah, the sky hangs quiet, with only a few ravens, hawks, and eagles spiraling through. The next day, whoosh! Swallows arrive…

Field Notes #4

It is the destiny of mint to be crushed. –Waverley Lewis Root June 12, 2007 Rained most of the night. Morning’s cool and sweet. Good day to venture into a canyon. Because the storm has left behind puffy white seeds…

Quality

Warning: To write this post, I’ve had to get personal. I apologize in advance for that, but some points I make require grounding in my observations about personal experiences, many of which are highly charged. The stories and observations I…

Fields Notes #3

Who I am is not enough. It is necessary to become more. May 3, 2007 Been out of action nearly a month due to injury from hiking in broken-down boots. Finally bought new boots. Two days ago I made it…

Field Notes #2

We might use language in our attempts to set boundaries, but language contains in microcosmic acts the macrocosmic thrust toward new form. November 4, 2006 The trail into the canyon is rougher at November’s threshold; run-off from recent storms took…

Quothing the Raven

Some weeks ago a friend (an archaeologist and therefore a man of science) and I were discussing a nature writer who was coming to town to promote his latest book. I asked my friend if he liked this writer’s work.…

Field Notes #1

Remember the silence around Pueblo Alto in Chaco, so heavy you felt blanketed by its snows, and the desert landscape spread out below, unmoving for miles? That was silence. Not even a breeze singing on the stones. June 8, 2006…

Sweat

All winter I plotted how to improve the garden, my first focal point for exercising “good stewardship” over the acre plus we moved to a year and a half ago. Last year’s garden had gone all right. I loved every…